Labyrinth 2017 Workshop Pre-registration List





Name: Tzioumis Anastasios
E-mail: tasso.tzioumis@csiro.au
Affiliation: CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: TBD
Abstract: ??TBD??



Name: van Driel, Lidia
E-mail: lidia.vandriel@obspm.fr
Affiliation: University College London
Type of presentation: None
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Name: van Driel, Wim
E-mail: wim.vandriel@obspm.fr
Affiliation: Paris Observatory
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Keizer, Harry
E-mail: harrykeizer1@gmail.com
Affiliation: SETI@CAMRAS Dwingeloo Netherlands
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Ravi, Vikram
E-mail: v.vikram.ravi@gmail.com
Affiliation: Caltech
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: The brightest FRBs: a class distinct from the repeater(s)?
Abstract: Central to the mystery of FRBs is their wide range of phenomenologies. Some FRBs, like the repeater, are broad, faint and exhibit intrinsic temporal structure. Others are demonstrably scattered, likely intrinsically narrow, and luminous. I will argue that, based on intrinsic properties, propagation effects and localizations, some FRBs are repeaters and some (likely the brighter ones) are not. I will also present the first results from Caltech's Deep Synoptic Array 10-element prototype (DSA-10): an array designed to localize bright FRBs to <3-arcsecond accuracy at a rate of better than one event every month.



Name: Chatterjee, Shami
E-mail: shami@astro.cornell.edu
Affiliation: Cornell University
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Interfrometric Localization of Fast Radio Bursts
Abstract: The precise localization of a fast radio burst and the identification of its host galaxy or counterpart would allow constraints on its distance and energetics, and enable us to discriminate between various origin scenarios, from the local and mundane to the cosmological and exotic. Here we report on the results of an ongoing localization campaign on the repeating fast radio burst source, FRB 121102, with the VLA, Arecibo, and other telescopes.



Name: Cimo, Giuseppe
E-mail: cimo@jive.eu
Affiliation: JIVE and ASTRON
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Radio Astronomy and Space Science: VLBI observations of orbiters and landers
Abstract: Radio astronomy and space science get together in the Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE), which provides precise determination of the lateral position of spacecraft on the celestial sphere by means of phase referencing near-field VLBI observations. These measurements can be used for a variety of scientific applications, including planetary science, improvement of ephemerides, ultra-precise celestial mechanics of planetary systems, gravimetry, spacecraft orbit determination, and fundamental physics. This technique, complementary to radio science experiments, addresses those areas of spacecraft mission science objectives that require accurate estimation of spacecraft state vector. Indeed, the European Space Agency has selected PRIDE as an experiment of the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE), the forthcoming ESA's flagship mission to the Jupiter system. We will describe our approach to spacecraft observations and data processing by showing the results of a VLBI campaign involving 35 radio telescopes to observe the closest Phobos flyby by the ESA's spacecraft Mars Express and we will discuss the challenges of joining radio astronomy and space science.



Name: Cimo, Giuseppe
E-mail: cimo@jive.eu
Affiliation: JIVE and ASTRON
Type of presentation: Poster
Title: Supporting multi-wavelength and multi-messenger astronomy with ASTERICS
Abstract: Astronomy ESFRI and Research Infrastructure Cluster, ASTERICS, brings together astronomers and astroparticle physicists to help world-leading facilities, such as SKA, CTA, KM3NeT, and E-ELT, work together to find common solutions to their Big Data challenges, their interoperability and scheduling, and their data access. ASTERICS develops common solutions for streaming data processing and extremely large databases by creating of an open innovation environment and by establishing open standards for multi-wavelength/multi-messenger data. Cross-facility coordination is crucial in terms of response to multi-messenger transient alerts. Therefore, ASTERICS is also developing innovative methods for relaying alerts. Finally ASTERICS aims to open up multi-wavelength and multi messenger astronomy to scientists, through the Virtual Observatory, and to the general public, by means of citizen science mass participation experiments.



Name: Horesh Assaf
E-mail: assafh@mail.huji.ac.il
Affiliation: Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Lessons from the last decade of time-domain astronomy
Abstract: Over the last few decades, the field of time-domain astronomy has provided us with several surprising discoveries. Some of the discoveries are a result of unveiling new details about known phenomena while others are the discoveries of new types of transients. A key factor, leading to these findings, is the many new phase spaces that time-domain projects have been exploring. Several examples come to mind, such as the discovery of super luminous supernovae, the first detection of the onset of a relativistic tidal disruption event, the unveiling of a new population of fast radio bursts, and last but not least, the first discovery of a gravitational wave event from a coalescence of binary black holes. In my talk, I will present some of the key results from time-domain experiments, which include panchromatic studies of various transient phenomena, and discuss the lessons we have learned in preparation for future experiments.



Name: Brown, Shea
E-mail: shea-brown@uiowa.edu
Affiliation: University of Iowa
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Obrocka Monika
E-mail: mobrocka@ska.ac.za
Affiliation: SKA SA
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Possenti, Andrea
E-mail: possenti@oa-cagliari.inaf.it
Affiliation: INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: TBD
Abstract: tbd



Name: Bassett, Bruce
E-mail: bruce.a.bassett@gmail.com
Affiliation: AIMS /SAAO/UCT
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Machine Learning detection of new classes of objects
Abstract: We discuss the challenges in blind discovery of new classes of objects in large amounts of data. The key issue is feature selection: which subset of observables - out of the infinite potential set - should one select to find the new class, given that we know nothing about it.



Name: Miriam Janssen
E-mail: magarrett1964@gmail.com
Affiliation:
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Garrett, Michael
E-mail: michael.garrett@manchester.ac.uk
Affiliation: Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: All-sky Radio SETI
Abstract: I argue that intelligent civilisations are rare in the Milky Way (both spatially and temporally), and that success in detecting an artificial SETI signal requires an all-sky radio capability. Based on generic aperture array technology (e.g. the SKA2-mid prototype MANTIS), such an instrument operating at ~ 1 GHz could also be useful for transients observations and other large-scale (spectral-line) radio surveys.



Name: Keith Bannister
E-mail: keith.bannister@csiro.au
Affiliation: CSIRO ATNF
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Fast Radio Bursts detections with ASKAP
Abstract: ASKAP's high-time-resolution mode is just coming online at the time of writing. We expect to have a a number of FRB candidates by the time of the conference. I will summarise ASKAP FRB search system, which has a number of innovative elements, and the results of this FRB search.



Name: Tingay, Steven
E-mail: stingay@ira.inaf.it
Affiliation: INAF
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Karastergiou, Aris
E-mail: aris.karastergiou@gmail.com
Affiliation: Oxford
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Tbd
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Name: Foster, Griffin
E-mail: griffin.foster@gmail.com
Affiliation: University of Oxford
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: TBD
Abstract: Something on building learning-based SETI detection methods, and rigorous test beds for verification.



Name: Lindqvist Michael
E-mail: michael.lindqvist@chalmers.se
Affiliation: Onsala Space Observatory
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Ray Norris
E-mail: raypnorris@gmail.com
Affiliation: WSU/CSIRO
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Building Machine Astronomers to Discover the Unexpected in Astronomical Surveys
Abstract: Most major discoveries in astronomy are unplanned, and result from surveying the Universe in a new way, rather than by testing a hypothesis or conducting an investigation with planned outcomes. Next-generation astronomical survey telescopes will significantly expand the volume of observational parameter space, and should in principle discover unexpected new phenomena and new types of object. However, the complexity of the telescopes and the large data volumes mean that these discoveries are unlikely to be found by chance, or by humans. Instead, we have to build tools to discover the unexpected. Here I discuss specific using machine learning techniques that we are developing, largely based on machine learning algorithms, to discover the unexpected in the EMU survey.



Name: Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie
E-mail: Melanie.Johnston-Hollitt@vuw.ac.nz
Affiliation: Victoria University of Wellington (for now)
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Creativity and Heresy - Changing culture to build effective scientific ecosystems
Abstract: What conditions do we need for successful exploitation of scientific phase space? Why do certain individuals drive productivity in their fields more than others? How can we leverage off an increasingly connected digital world, to get the most out of future instruments? In this talk I'd like to expand on these topics which I covered in the summary to RonFest - Ron is a heretic, a creative and a connector of people and in doing so he has driven radio astronomy forward in unexpected ways, but he's not alone, this pattern of work is seen to be effective in many fields and it's a trait we should harshness if we really want to explore the scientific phase space instruments like SKA will provide. So, this is not a talk about any individuals, this is a talk about how to build the best science networks, and then how to exploit them. At least, that's what I'm thinking at this stage!



Name: Marisa Geyer
E-mail: marisa.geyer@gmail.com
Affiliation: Oxford University
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Elmarie van Heerden
E-mail: elmarie.vanheerden@lmh.ox.ac.uk
Affiliation: University of Oxford
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: TBD
Abstract: TBD



Name: Ken Kellermann
E-mail: kkellerm@nrao.edu
Affiliation: NRAO
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: TBD
Abstract: TBD



Name: Macquart, Jean-Pierre
E-mail: J.Macquart@curtin.edu.au
Affiliation: ICRAR/Curtin
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: TBD
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Name: Camilo, Fernando
E-mail: fernando@ska.ac.za
Affiliation: SKA South Africa
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Sim, Helen
E-mail: Helen.Sim@sydney.edu.au
Affiliation: CAASTRO
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Jianbin,Li
E-mail: lijb@bao.ac.cn
Affiliation: National Astronomical Observatories Of China
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Jauncey, David
E-mail: david.jauncey@csiro.au
Affiliation: CASS and RSAA, ANU
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: TBD
Abstract: TBD



Name: greg hellbourg
E-mail: greg.hellbourg@gmail.com
Affiliation: UC Berkeley
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: SETI & RFI
Abstract: Lots of evidence of intelligent communicative beings are found every day in radio astronomical data. Some are terrestrial, some are extra-terrestrial, but most of them have human origins. Recent advances in signal processing addressed the problem of signal characterization and mitigation in the context of spectrum sharing. Is our current instrumentation and data processing close to an optimum for detecting an extraterrestrial intelligence? Can we reliably separate radio frequency interference and extraterrestrial transmissions? We will investigate in this talk a possible way to combine telecommunication and astronomy to answer those questions.



Name: Zsolt Paragi
E-mail: zparagi@jive.eu
Affiliation: JIVE
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Localizing fast transients with the e-EVN
Abstract: Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is a powerful technique to localize and study radio transients on milliarcsecond (mas) scales. In the past few years we have been working on a technique to search for and localize dispersed signals from fast radio transients. Following our success with test observations of a rotating radio transient (RRAT) J1819-1458, we started an e-EVN monitoring programme of the repeating fast radio burst FRB121102 in 2016. I will talk about the various steps needed for FRB pulse detection with the e-EVN, as well as our initial campaign to localize FRB121102 that resulted in the detection of a persistent radio source compact on mas scales. The follow-up experiments and mas-scale localization of FRB121102 bursts will be presented by Benito Marcote in a related talk.



Name: Marcote, Benito
E-mail: marcote@jive.eu
Affiliation: Joint Institute for VLBI ERIC (JIVE)
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Localizing a Fast Radio Burst on milliarcsecond angular scales
Abstract: Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are radio transient sources that emit a single pulse with a duration of only a few milliseconds. They were firstly discovered in 2007, and nowadays we have detected tens of these events using single-dish radio observatories. However, their physical origin remains completely unknown mainly due to the limited resolution of these instruments. Early this year we reported the first unambiguous localization of a Fast Radio Burst, the repeating FRB 121102. In this talk I will focus on the results obtained with the European VLBI Network (EVN), which allowed us to localize the bursts on milliarcsecond angular scales. We show that the bursts are coincident with a persistent and compact radio source with a projected separation of less than 40 pc. Additionally to this, we put constraints in the size of the persistent radio source to be less than 0.7 pc, and further support to its extragalactic origin from the observed scintillation effects and scatter broadening. These results, together with the VLA and optical data, represent the first detailed studies on the counterpart of a Fast Radio Burst. Most of the models proposed in the past cannot explain the observed properties of FRB 121102. We argue that a burst source associated with a massive black hole or a neutron star energizing a young superluminous supernova are the two scenarios that best match the observed data of FRB 121102.



Name: Philip Diamond
E-mail: p.diamond@skatelescope.org
Affiliation: SKA
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: SKA and its impact on world astronomy
Abstract: I will provide a very brief report on the current status of SKA and then focus on the impact of SKA on world astronomy. I will describe the changes SKA is bringing in terms of the introduction fo system engineering practices, the professionalisation of engineering and cost estimations. I will also touch on the potential changes to the world of radio astronomy as SKA is constructed and becomes operational.



Name: Woltjer, Lodewijk
E-mail: ulla.dw@bluewin.ch
Affiliation:
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Woltjer, Ulla
E-mail: ulla.dw@bluewin.ch
Affiliation:
Type of presentation: None
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Name: McFadden, Rebecca
E-mail: rebecca.mcfadden@eng.ox.ac.uk
Affiliation: University of Oxford
Type of presentation: Poster
Title: Machine Learning for Radio Transient Detection
Abstract: TBA



Name: McAdam Bruce & Janice
E-mail: jabr.mc@gmail.com
Affiliation: University of Sydney
Type of presentation: None
Title:
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Name: Maccone Claudio
E-mail: clmaccon@libero.it
Affiliation: Int'l Academy of Astronautics (IAA) & INAF (Italy)
Type of presentation: Oral
Title: Relativistic eigenfunctions for uniformly-accelerated spaceflight
Abstract: This author has calculated the KLT eigenfunctions for electromagnetic waves between a planet and a spacecraft moving away at a uniform acceleration, like solar sails pushed by lasers (StarShot). They are Bessel functions of the first kind and order zero. The time is ripe to apply them, as recently suggested by Avi Loeb and others.



Name: Tim Cornwell
E-mail: realtimcornwell@gmail.com
Affiliation: Tim Cornwell consulting
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Bilili Vasiliki
E-mail: vmpilili@gmail.com
Affiliation: I am an Electrical and Computer Engineer, graduated from NTUA and member of the Astrophysics society of Asea village
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Lambrou Charalambos
E-mail: chlabrou@gmail.com
Affiliation: I am an Electrical and Computer Engineer, MSc, PhD and member of the Astrophysics society of Asea village
Type of presentation: None
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Name: Trakas Panagiotis
E-mail: pantrak2011@yahoo.gr
Affiliation: Student of Archaeology
Type of presentation: None
Title: Vsitor like an Archaeology's Scientist
Abstract: Αγαπητοί φίλοι καλημέρα σας και συγχαρητήρια για την εκδήλωσή σας. Σας στέλνω αυτο το μήνυμα επειδή θα ήθελα να συμμετάσχω ως αεπισκέπτης-ακροατής στο συνέδριο ραδιοαστρονομίας. Με τιμή Παναγιώτης Τράκας Τελειόφοιτος Αρχαιολογίας και Διαχείρισης Πολιτισμικών Αγαθών τμήματος Ιστορίας Αρχαιολογίας και Διαχείρισης Πολιτισμικών Αγαθών Πανεπιστημίου Πελοποννήσου, Καλαμάτα



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Name: Jorgedom
E-mail: encomma@truckmetalworks.com
Affiliation: Nicolet High School
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Last updated: 23 Oct 2018