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April 09, 2012, at 03:10 PM by 150.229.106.28 -
Changed line 5 from:

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/audio/pulse.png

to:

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/audio/vela.avi

April 09, 2012, at 02:59 PM by 150.229.106.28 -
Changed line 5 from:

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/audio/vela.avi

to:

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/audio/pulse.png

April 09, 2012, at 02:56 PM by 150.229.106.28 -
Changed line 5 from:

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/audio/pulse.png

to:

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/audio/vela.avi

April 09, 2012, at 02:53 PM by 150.229.106.28 -
Added lines 9-13:

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/audio/CP1919.wav

Recording of the first-discovered pulsar CP1919 (PSR B1919+21) made at the Parkes radio telescope in April 2012. The observing frequency was 732 MHz and bandwidth 64 MHz. The audio is the detected and dedispersed signal modulating white noise.
Credit: R. N. Manchester, G. Hobbs and J. Khoo, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science

January 11, 2012, at 09:42 PM by rnm -
Changed lines 7-8 from:

Recording of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) made at the Green Bank 140-ft telescope of the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville VA, in September, 1970. The observing frequency was 1664 MHz with an IF bandwidth of 4 MHz. The Vela pulsar has a pulse period of 89 ms and the audio is the detected signal with a time constant of about 1 ms. <p>Credit: R. N. Manchester

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Recording of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) made at the Green Bank 140-ft telescope of the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville VA, in September, 1970. The observing frequency was 1664 MHz with an IF bandwidth of 4 MHz. The Vela pulsar has a pulse period of 89 ms and the audio is the detected signal with a time constant of about 1 ms.
Credit: R. N. Manchester

January 11, 2012, at 09:41 PM by rnm -
Changed lines 7-8 from:

Recording of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) made at the Green Bank 140-ft telescope of the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville VA, in September, 1970. The observing frequency was 1664 MHz with an IF bandwidth of 4 MHz. The Vela pulsar has a pulse period of 89 ms and the audio is the detected signal with a time constant of about 1 ms. Credit: R. N. Manchester

to:

Recording of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) made at the Green Bank 140-ft telescope of the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville VA, in September, 1970. The observing frequency was 1664 MHz with an IF bandwidth of 4 MHz. The Vela pulsar has a pulse period of 89 ms and the audio is the detected signal with a time constant of about 1 ms. <p>Credit: R. N. Manchester

January 11, 2012, at 09:40 PM by rnm -
Changed line 7 from:

Recording of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) made at the Green Bank 140-ft telescope of the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville VA, in September, 1970. The observing frequency was 1664 MHz with an IF bandwidth of 4 MHz. The audio is the detected signal with a time constant of about 1 ms. Credit: R. N. Manchester

to:

Recording of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) made at the Green Bank 140-ft telescope of the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville VA, in September, 1970. The observing frequency was 1664 MHz with an IF bandwidth of 4 MHz. The Vela pulsar has a pulse period of 89 ms and the audio is the detected signal with a time constant of about 1 ms. Credit: R. N. Manchester

March 15, 2009, at 02:50 PM by jkhoo -
Added lines 1-7:

Please give credit as listed if you make use of any audio files.

Click below to listen to the sound:

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/audio/pulse.png

Recording of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) made at the Green Bank 140-ft telescope of the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville VA, in September, 1970. The observing frequency was 1664 MHz with an IF bandwidth of 4 MHz. The audio is the detected signal with a time constant of about 1 ms. Credit: R. N. Manchester